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bashford:

Computed Copy by Nukem, So Kanno and yang02 of gokinjo-monozukuri.org

"Although there is a traditional way of designing flat patterns which considers the movement of the body and characteristics of the material, computers design it in a totally different way, because they recognize the 3D shape as a polygon which is a collective form of flat faces.

Our purpose for this “Computed Copy” is not only to make some distortion which humans cannot produce, but also to make garments which are not just “copy” and have the alternative creativity. By removing humans’ arbitrariness as much as possible from the process of copying designs, and by letting computers do it, we can create a new kind of designing system.

In the future, we think that it will be possible to copy a garment only with the image files on the internet without scanning actual things, thanks to the rapid development of 3D technology (scanning, modeling, and printing) and a flood of images on the internet. We expect that this work will be the fastest automated way of copying the designs as the final destination of fast fashion.”

Exhibited at Materializing II

Thanks Toby


Reblogged from bashford

23 computer viruses, visualized by 23 illustrators and designers.
Check out Computerviruscatalog.com

Via: ww.facebook.com/TheNewAesthetic

Well worth watching if you’re into weirdness.
David O’Reilly animated the videogame part in Her by Spike Jonze and last week released a $1,- game called Mountain which was reviewed by The Atlantic in the context of his earlier work.

+ Review of Mountain on The Atlantic
+ David O’Reilly’s tumblr


Reblogged from joanielemercier

mymodernmet:

Audiovisual artist Joanie Lemercier recently unveiled Nimbes, a spectacular 360º installation that immerses viewers in a breathtaking virtual universe. Created using photography, CGI, laser scans, and projection mapping, the piece takes the audience on a 15-minute journey around the cosmos, displaying constellations, solitary landscapes, and crumbling architectural structures.

Impressive immersive installation by Joanie Lemercier (former AntiVJ)!

Tribute to John Carpenter’s consumer critical science fiction film They Live by artists Stephen Zeigler and Calder Greenwood in downtown LA.
I recently saw the film for the first time because it was referenced in Slavoj Zizek’s The Pervert’s Guide to Ideology and although the acting is reminiscent of any iteration of Police Academy, there are some gripping scenes where the protagonist finds out that everyone is living inside a neoliberal charade when he puts on a pair of sunglasses that reveal the truth of the matter.

+ The full article on LA Taco

From: http://booktwo.org/notebook/surveillance-spaulder/

skrekkogle:

non-conductive punishment gloves prevents usage of capacitive touch screens

:)

skrekkogle:

non-conductive punishment gloves prevents usage of capacitive touch screens

:)


Reblogged from skrekkogle
thisistheverge:

Textual healing: are apps the future of therapy? Compared with finding a therapist in a big city, signing up for text-message therapy was a breeze. All I had to do was open an app on my phone, pick a username, and type my first message. Predictably, the first thing I wrote my new therapist was a question: “Hi. How does this work? Do I just tell you about myself?” The app is an iOS-only release called Talkspace. Launched in March, it aims to connect users to their very own licensed therapist, and then have the two communicate via instant message. “We aren’t going to ask you a ton of questions,” says Talkspace co-founder Oren Frank, an assertive, good-natured Israeli who used to be the global chief creative officer at marketing agency MRM Worldwide. “We want to get you to talk to the therapist as quickly as possible.” That’s why the company doesn’t ask potential users to fill out lengthy questionnaires about their mental health history before giving them access to a private therapy room — a Whatsapp-like encrypted platform that only a user and their therapist can enter.

Sofa not included

thisistheverge:

Textual healing: are apps the future of therapy?
Compared with finding a therapist in a big city, signing up for text-message therapy was a breeze. All I had to do was open an app on my phone, pick a username, and type my first message. Predictably, the first thing I wrote my new therapist was a question: “Hi. How does this work? Do I just tell you about myself?” The app is an iOS-only release called Talkspace. Launched in March, it aims to connect users to their very own licensed therapist, and then have the two communicate via instant message. “We aren’t going to ask you a ton of questions,” says Talkspace co-founder Oren Frank, an assertive, good-natured Israeli who used to be the global chief creative officer at marketing agency MRM Worldwide. “We want to get you to talk to the therapist as quickly as possible.” That’s why the company doesn’t ask potential users to fill out lengthy questionnaires about their mental health history before giving them access to a private therapy room — a Whatsapp-like encrypted platform that only a user and their therapist can enter.

  • Sofa not included

Reblogged from thisistheverge